Did you know that a group of zebras is called a dazzle?

While zebras may be numerous on the African plains, we never tire of watching them. Their beautifully-decorated bodies, combined with their fascinating and entertaining behaviors, make them a truly endearing creature.

There are only six surviving horse species in the world and three of them are zebras. The Burchell’s Zebra (shown here) is the most common and can be found throughout Southern and Eastern Africa. Compared with other species, the Burchell’s has rather broad stripes, but the color of those stripes can vary quite a bit depending on their location. In Southern Africa for example, individuals exhibit shadow stripes between the large black stripes on their torso, and you can see that effect in the zebras in this gallery. Baby zebras are much fuzzier and have a reddish-brown hue in their stripes. And, of course, the stripe pattern on every zebra is unique, just like your finger print.

This Burchell’s zebra photo gallery includes pictures taken during various seasons in Kruger National Park, South Africa and in Etosha National Park, Namibia. We hope you enjoy this dazzling dazzle of zebras. (All photos by Cristina Garcia and Hal Brindley.)

 

Mutual head-resting strengthens  the bond between a zebra and her foal.

Mutual head-resting strengthens the bond between a zebra and her foal.

 

    Zebra stallions will aggressively bite their opponent's head and neck during a quarrel.

Zebra stallions will aggressively bite their opponent’s head and neck during a quarrel.

 

 

The tattooed horse.

The tattooed horse.

 

 

A dazzle of zebras graze on a stormy evening in Etosha, Namibia

A dazzle of zebras grazing on a stormy evening in Etosha, Namibia

 

A constant parade of zebras visit the Okaukuejo waterhole in Etosha.

A constant parade of zebras visit the Okaukuejo waterhole in Etosha.

 

Zebras make a stop at Twee Palms waterhole in Etosha, Namibia

Zebras make a stop at Twee Palms waterhole in Etosha, Namibia

 

When the sun sets, it's time to stay alert for lions.

When the sun sets, it’s time to stay alert for lions.

 

Stripe patterns may make it difficult for predators to single out an individual from a group. Notice the shadow stripes on these zebras in Namibia.

Stripe patterns may make it difficult for predators to single out an individual from a group. Notice the shadow stripes on these zebras in Namibia.

 

Lions don't generally hunt during the day but this zebra still maintains a wide berth.

Lions don’t generally hunt during the day but this zebra still maintains a wide berth.

 

Not all lion attacks are successful. Claw marks are clearly visible on this survivor's back side.

Not all lion attacks are successful. Claw marks are clearly visible on this survivor’s back side.

 

This mother survived an attack (as evidenced by her healed scars) and lived on to raise a foal.

This mother survived an attack (as evidenced by her healed scars) and lived on to raise a foal.

 

    We usually call baby zebras "fuzzy butts" because of the soft furry hair that stands tall on their rear ends.

We usually call baby zebras “fuzzy butts” because of the soft furry hair that stands tall on their rear ends.

 

 

When a fight gets especially serious between two stallions, the biting escalates to kicking.

When a fight gets especially serious between two stallions, the biting escalates to kicking.

 

 

A row of drinking zebras is truly one of the most dazzling sights in the African savannah.

A row of drinking zebras is truly one of the most dazzling sights in the African savannah.

 

 

That's all folks!

That’s all folks!

 

Which photo is your favorite?

 

 Other Photo Galleries


 

MANATEES!

Manatee close-up

Sometimes manatees get so close!

 

WILDLIFE BABIES: A MOTHER’S DAY PHOTO GALLERY

Lion cub and mother. Kruger National Park, South Africa.

Lion cub and mother. Kruger National Park